Why metre gauge converted into broad gauge? The End of Golden Era of Indian Railways

It is said that necessity is the mother of invention, all discovery and inventions human being done, when they realized need of that. The need of human and the desire to make the earth a better place is the inspiration behind all inventions. Necessity force people to invent and do new things. When human realized that the journey of bullock cart is not convenient and neither does it save time. So many fast moving vehicles have invented, the rail is also included, but changes over time have become the principle of the world, therefore it has been a lot of change and today the world has come a long way in Science and Technology. There are some memories in life that people can never forget. Some memories of Supaul - Tharbitia - Saharsa - Mansi old Metre Gauge line trains.
Metre gauge means that the distance between the two rails is 1 m. There are a few railway routes still having metre gauge. e.g. Ahmedabad - Udaipur.

Why is a metre gauge converted into a broad gauge?

If this question is asked in an Indian context, we have a simple term for that, ‘PROJECT UNIGAUGE”. Its an exercise to convert all metre and narrow gauge tracks in the country to the 5’6″ Indian Railways Broad gauge (BG) so as to eliminate any transfers and increase speeds and capacity.
It was started in the 1990s and since then many iconic routes have been converted to BG. A few hill railways will not be converted due to their heritage status.
Four narrow and metre gauge lines are declared as heritage lines and will not be converted to broad gauge. These are:

Darjeeling Himalayan Railway (88 km)
Nilgiri Mountain Railway (46 km)
Kalka - Shimla Railway (96 km)
Matheran Hill Railway (21 km)
Why metre gauge converted into broad gauge? The End of Golden Era of Indian Railways Why metre gauge converted into broad gauge? The End of Golden Era of Indian Railways Reviewed by SHERE KHOJRAHA on April 28, 2019 Rating: 5

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